8 Tips to Increase Your Diving Confidence

Many people feel anxious before a dive when they are starting out on their scuba diving journey. It is completely understandable as it is a new realm that is being explored. Beginners don’t know what it is going to feel like underwater or if they will enjoy it. It feels like there are so many things to think about to start with.
I hope my tips to building your confidence will help you prepare for your amazing underwater experiences. And trust me… you will love it!

 

1 – Professional Training Builds Your Diving Confidence

Years of research and tried and tested techniques have gone into formulating today’s scuba diving courses. Modern scuba diving training has been specifically designed to alleviate stress and slowly build on skills to a point where divers are ready to go out into open water. Organizations, such as PADI, have skills and procedures that divers must learn in sequence – these standards are adhered to by PADI Instructors worldwide. Studying theory, watching videos and learning skills in the pool is followed by practicing in the sea with your instructor. This allows you to slowly develop at your own pace – only progressing when you are comfortable with each section.

 

2 – Knowing Your Equipment Increases Diving Confidence

During your scuba diving training, you will learn how to set up, adjust, check, and don your equipment. Understanding how your equipment works will give you added confidence and alleviate stress. Making sure everything is fitted correctly and securely, with the help of your instructor or buddy, is very important.

 

3 – Confined Water Practice Raises Diving Confidence

As I mentioned earlier, your training is performance-based, and you will have ample time to learn and practice scuba diving skills in the pool before heading out to the open water. Your instructor will assess your capabilities and allow extra time for practice if needed. Likewise, if you haven’t dived for a while then it’s a great idea to jump back into the pool for a Scuba Review.

 

4 – Correct Weighting and Buoyancy Assist Diving Confidence

Divers perform weight checks on the surface before a dive to determine that they have the correct amount of weight. You will be taught this during your training. If you are worried when you start your open water dive that you may be under weighted, then ask the instructor to carry spares or have spare weights available at the end of the dive on a descent line. It is a mistake to overweight yourself, as this will make you consume air faster and alter your buoyancy and trim when underwater.

 

5 – Breathing Techniques Help Diving Confidence

Begin your dive relaxed and calm – give yourself time at the start of the dive to become relaxed with slow, deep breathing. Allow yourself to orientate to being underwater by pausing after your descent. Take time to regulate your breathing, check your equipment and computer, and to signal to your buddy that everything is OK. Then you can focus on having fun and discovering the amazing marine life!

 

6 – Discuss Diving Confidence

Build your confidence by talking to your instructor and other divers about their experiences. You will find people’s passion and love for the sport is infectious; divers love to share their underwater adventures and knowledge. If you feel nervous before a dive then talk to your instructor or buddy. They will assist you in identifying what is causing your nerves and help you to solve any issues.

 

7 – Watching Videos

Training agencies such as PADI have videos that complement their courses. They are a great way to see what it is like underwater before you go! Watching videos will prepare you for your first experience by visually demonstrating the theory you have learned. Popular online sites such as YouTube are a good resource for finding footage of various dive sites and marine life.

 

8 – Relax and Enjoy!

My final piece of advice is to relax, take your time and enjoy. Don’t rush to set up your equipment and work at your own pace when getting ready for your dive. When you rush, you create stress and may not follow the procedures you have been taught. Similarly, don’t rush around underwater – take time to appreciate what nature has created and enjoy the full experience of breathing underwater.

 

Have you experienced pre-dive nerves? Tell us about it and share your experiences with others!

4 Responses

  1. Thank you.

    • Thanks Mark – I hope this article shows that it is a wonderful experience to scuba dive after proper training :)

  2. Can’t wait to go again because it’s been at least four years for me.

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